Writers in YA

I’ve always had a special connection with books that include characters who love to write or enjoy reading. Part of me thinks that’s because bookish people are some of the most passionate, kind, hardworking people there are, and I want to read about those sorts of people. But really, I think the main reason is because, as a reader and a writer (what a surprise) I’m able to connect with these characters and see a piece of myself within them. As readers and writers, we’re all connected. There’s something about the love of books and the written word that ties us all together — the adoration of stories and storytelling is something we all grow up on, and the ones that keep this passion throughout adulthood have a sense of creativity and empathy that might not be as prominent in other people. So you, as a reader or a writer, are spectacular. That’s what I’m trying to say.

It’s amazing to open a book and be able to see a part of yourself on the page — whether that be represented through your cultural identity, your sexual orientation, your disabilities, your neurodiveristy, or even something seemingly as simple as your passions or interests. It’s so important that readers, especially teens and young adults, are able to see a part of themselves in what they read, because seeing people like yourself is something that shows your identity or who you are is valid. You matter, and as a reader, you deserve to see people like you in the books that you read. That’s why reading diversely and supporting #OwnVoices is so important — to show young people that they matter.

I could go on and on about my identity as a neurodivergent queer cis woman and how I see myself represented in what I read, but today I want to talk about a different part of my identity — my identity as a writer. I love reading about writers and content creators more than anything, specifically because those are the people I identify with and those are the things I want to be doing with my life: writing and creating other cool content. To me, if you hand me a book with a good writer character that I can either want to nurture or swoon over, where their writing process is realistic and relatable, there’s a 99% chance it will end up on my Favourites shelf. So today I’d like to recommend some of my favourite books with writer characters in them to you!

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Writing Advice from a Complete Amateur

Hello friends! As most of you won’t have noticed, my blogging schedule has been pretty much non-existent for the past six weeks. And that’s because I’ve been working on my first drat of a very exciting new manuscript! I’ve managed to almost finish my first draft in this time, and I’m hoping to smash out the final few thousand words in the coming days. It’s been great to become immersed in the world I’m creating and get to know my characters, and I’ve found this time off really useful to get back into that creative mindset and take a step back from blogging for a bit.

But earlier this week, I realised that I actually really missed blogging, and talking to y’all! So today I’m announcing my official return to bi-weekly (and maybe even tri-weekly, if I’m organised) blogging! To celebrate, I’ll be sharing a bit about how and what I’m writing, my writing process, and my advice to all of you! Do keep in mind that I definitely don’t consider myself a writing professional and that the writing process varies for everyone.

Without further ado, let me share my somewhat dubious words of wisdom with y’all!

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One Would Think the Deep – book review

One Would Think the Deep

One Would Think the Deep, written by Claire Zorn, is a breathtaking ode to the Australian coast and growing up in the 90s that allows readers to lose themselves in the evocative descriptions of landscape, life and love.

It’s 1997 and seventeen-year-old Sam is mourning the sudden loss of his mum. Sam has always had things going on in his head that no one else understands, not even his mum. And now she’s dead, it’s worse than ever.

With nothing but his skateboard and a few belongings in a garbage bag, Sam goes to live with the strangers his mum cut ties with seven years ago: Aunty Lorraine and his cousins Shane and Minty. Sam soon reverts to his childhood habit of following Minty around and finds himself learning to surf in order to cut through the static fuzz in his head. But the days slowly meld into one another, and as ghosts from the past begin to reappear, Sam has to make the ultimate decision: will he sink, or will he swim?Read More »

A Monster Calls – book review

A Monster Calls

A Monster Calls is a poignant and powerful book, written by Patrick Ness, illustrated by Jim Kay, and inspired by an idea from Siobhan Down.

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the nightmare he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments; the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming…

This monster, though, is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wasn’t the most dangerous thing of all from Conor.

It wants the truth.Read More »