The Best and the Worst Series Endings

Have you ever been so invested in a series, but then felt let down by the way it ended? Have you ever felt personally victimised by the characters killed off by your favourite authors? Do you ever feel like there’s no happy medium between endings that are TOO PERFECT or where EVERYONE DIES? Well, I certainly have. And I’m angry.

Today I’m going to discuss some of the different types of endings I’ve come across, and why I don’t like them! It’s rare that series end EXACTLY THE WAY I WANT THEM TO, but some ‘classic endings’ infuriate me more than others. And then I’m going to tell you all about the most memorable endings to series in my reading history! TIME TO RELIVE ALL THE FEELS.

Everybody Dies

I’m not talking about, like, one main character and a few minor characters. I’m talking about LITERALLY EVERYONE. Especially the characters you loved most. It’s like the author was undecided on how to end the series, so they just killed EVERYONE. And that’s not okay, especially when it feels more like a cop-out and less like a planned decision. I’m a fan of death and destruction, but only in small doses. I’m not COMPLETELY evil.


Overly Happy

Maybe I’m just a soulless Slytherin, but I just HATE it when epic series have overly happy endings. Like, there might be scenes and scenes of battles and deaths, civilians dropping like flies, but the main characters will remain untouched. I know it’s always hard to see your favourite characters die, but it also feels like I’ve been robbed when I’ve been taken on such an emotional journey. Give me death! Give me suffering! Give me heartbreak! Make me hate the author but love them at the same time, leaving me with an ending I’ll never forget.Read More »

Should Gifs Replace Star Ratings?

Due to an unknown error, I’ve had to repost this post! Apologies!

If you’re anything like me, choosing how to rate a book is almost as hard as overcoming the traumatic death of your favourite character. Okay, maybe it’s just a little easier than that. It can be so hard to decide how to rate a book. I mean, what if you loved it, but not as much as some of the other books you’ve rated five stars, but there wasn’t anything you could fault about it in order to rate it four stars? What if you found a book pretty meh, but you’re not sure whether three stars is too generous or two stars is too critical? What if you’d just rather curl up into the foetal position and try not to think about how tough your life is as a book lover?

But today, I think I’ve found the solution. Instead of using stars, I suggest that we all commit to using a gif to summarise our feelings. I mean, there are endless gifs—surely there’d be one to fit your every need. Gifs are a way of sharing our feelings in one succinct moving picture that can convey more than an entire paragraph of gushing or ranting. So here are the pros and cons of using a star rating, compared to a gif, to rate the books you read.Read More »

Writers in YA

I’ve always had a special connection with books that include characters who love to write or enjoy reading. Part of me thinks that’s because bookish people are some of the most passionate, kind, hardworking people there are, and I want to read about those sorts of people. But really, I think the main reason is because, as a reader and a writer (what a surprise) I’m able to connect with these characters and see a piece of myself within them. As readers and writers, we’re all connected. There’s something about the love of books and the written word that ties us all together — the adoration of stories and storytelling is something we all grow up on, and the ones that keep this passion throughout adulthood have a sense of creativity and empathy that might not be as prominent in other people. So you, as a reader or a writer, are spectacular. That’s what I’m trying to say.

It’s amazing to open a book and be able to see a part of yourself on the page — whether that be represented through your cultural identity, your sexual orientation, your disabilities, your neurodiveristy, or even something seemingly as simple as your passions or interests. It’s so important that readers, especially teens and young adults, are able to see a part of themselves in what they read, because seeing people like yourself is something that shows your identity or who you are is valid. You matter, and as a reader, you deserve to see people like you in the books that you read. That’s why reading diversely and supporting #OwnVoices is so important — to show young people that they matter.

I could go on and on about my identity as a neurodivergent queer cis woman and how I see myself represented in what I read, but today I want to talk about a different part of my identity — my identity as a writer. I love reading about writers and content creators more than anything, specifically because those are the people I identify with and those are the things I want to be doing with my life: writing and creating other cool content. To me, if you hand me a book with a good writer character that I can either want to nurture or swoon over, where their writing process is realistic and relatable, there’s a 99% chance it will end up on my Favourites shelf. So today I’d like to recommend some of my favourite books with writer characters in them to you!

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Writing Advice from a Complete Amateur

Hello friends! As most of you won’t have noticed, my blogging schedule has been pretty much non-existent for the past six weeks. And that’s because I’ve been working on my first drat of a very exciting new manuscript! I’ve managed to almost finish my first draft in this time, and I’m hoping to smash out the final few thousand words in the coming days. It’s been great to become immersed in the world I’m creating and get to know my characters, and I’ve found this time off really useful to get back into that creative mindset and take a step back from blogging for a bit.

But earlier this week, I realised that I actually really missed blogging, and talking to y’all! So today I’m announcing my official return to bi-weekly (and maybe even tri-weekly, if I’m organised) blogging! To celebrate, I’ll be sharing a bit about how and what I’m writing, my writing process, and my advice to all of you! Do keep in mind that I definitely don’t consider myself a writing professional and that the writing process varies for everyone.

Without further ado, let me share my somewhat dubious words of wisdom with y’all!

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The Great Hierarchy of Books & Authors

One of the things that annoys me most about the bookish community, both online and off, is the way that some authors look down upon others. From what I’ve seen and heard, this can happen for a variety of reasons, some of which being the genre or readership for which an author writes, or because of the gender of the writer—most of the time, female writers are looked down upon when writing in certain genres, which is really disappointing to see. But what I want to discuss today is something different. I want to talk about the supposed hierarchy of authors, and why those who self-publish their novels shouldn’t be looked down upon.

It angers me that any author should be looked down upon because of what they write, or how they get published. Whether they have an agent or one of the biggest publishing houses representing them, or whether they chose to self-publish is irrelevant to me, and to most readers. But most of all, I hate the idea that some people have that those who self-publish do so because they ‘wouldn’t have gotten published any other way’ or because it was a ‘last-resort’, due to their writing quality being sub-standard. This isn’t true at all, and if you read Heart of Mist and some of the other awesome self-published novels out there, you’ll come to see just how wrong those people are.

 

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Reading What You Enjoy

‘Read what you enjoy.’ It’s a phrase that we’ve all probably heard before in our lives, and have maybe even said to some people. You might tell someone who has different tastes in books to you to just ‘read what you enjoy’, end of conversation. If someone isn’t feeling the particular book they’re attempting to read, you might suggest putting it down in favour of reading something ‘you enjoy’. But sometimes the most important books are the ones that not everyone will ‘enjoy’. In the typical sense of the word, I ‘enjoy’ books that are easy to read and are a bit exciting and adventurous, but that I can read to escape reality and experience new worlds. Should that mean that I shouldn’t read the more confronting, powerful novels just because they won’t be easy reads or something merely created for entertainment value?

One of the most important questions readers have to ask themselves is this: What is the purpose of reading? Why do you read? Is it to escape your own reality, or to pass the time? Is it to experience things that might not be possible in your own life? Do you like to learn about people who are different to you in a multitude of ways? Or do you read to educate yourself?Read More »

Writing Diversely

Today I want to talk about something that has been on my mind for a while now. If you’re a part of the bookish community online, specifically on Twitter, you’re bound to have seen the discussion surrounding diversity and #OwnVoices and making space for marginalised writers. I absolutely believe that we should be reading and promoting more books by marginalised writers, as well as seeking out #OwnVoices novels, but has this gone too far in some aspects?

We want to read books written by people about their own stories and identities, but at the same time, it’s important to recognise that that shouldn’t be the only experiences these authors are capable of writing about. If you’re a marginalised author, you shouldn’t be confined to writing about characters of your own specific identity, but at the same time, privileged writers shouldn’t only have to write about characters of their identity. It’s important to respect the spaces of marginalised writers and promote their own stories and books, but at the same time, we need to recognise that authors shouldn’t have to stay in their own lanes if that means not including characters who are of different cultural backgrounds or identities to themselves. And we also shouldn’t demand authors justify themselves and their right to write what they do – many authors may not feel comfortable disclosing such personal details about their lives and it’s not the reader’s place to pry. It’s simply disrespectful and invasive.Read More »

Labyrinth Lost – book review

labyrinth-lost

Alex is a bruja, the most powerful witch in a generation…and she hates magic. At her Deathday celebration, Alex performs a spell to rid herself of her power. But it backfires. Her whole family vanishes into thin air, leaving her alone with Nova, a brujo boy she can’t trust. A boy whose intentions are as dark as the strange markings on his skin.

The only way to get her family back is to travel with Nova to Los Lagos, a land in-between, as dark as Limbo and as strange as Wonderland…

Beautiful Creatures meets Daughter of Smoke and Bone with an infusion of Latin American tradition in this highly original fantasy adventure.Read More »

Swarm – book review

swarm-book

They thought they’d already faced their toughest fight. But there’s no relaxing for the reunited Zeroes.

These six teens with unique abilities have taken on bank robbers, drug dealers and mobsters. Now they’re trying to lay low so they can get their new illegal nightclub off the ground.

But the quiet doesn’t last long when two strangers come to town, bringing with them a whole different kind of crowd-based chaos. And hot on their tails is a crowd-power even more dangerous and sinister.

Up against these new enemies, every Zero is under threat. Mob is crippled by the killing-crowd buzz—is she really evil at her core? Flicker is forced to watch the worst things a crowd can do. Crash’s conscience—and her heart—get a workout. Anon and Scam must both put family loyalties on the line for the sake of survival. And Bellwether’s glorious-leader mojo deserts him.

Who’s left to lead the Zeroes into battle against a new, murderous army?Read More »

Cell 7 – book review

Cell 7 book

Should she live or die? You decide.

An adored celebrity has been killed. Sixteen-year-old Martha Honeydew was found holding a gun, standing over the body.

Now Justice must prevail.

The general public will decide whether Martha is innocent or guilty by viewing daily episodes of the hugely popular TV show Death is Justice, the only TV show that gives the power of life and death decisions – all for the price of a phone call.

Martha has admitted to the crime. But is she guilty? Or is reality sometimes more complicated than the images we are shown on TV?Read More »